Children who study music tend to have larger vocabularies and more advanced reading skills than their peers who do not participate in music lessons.

"Statistical benefits of music in education." Arete Music Academy, 2014.


Children with learning disabilities or dyslexia who tend to lose focus with more noise could benefit greatly from music lessons.

"Statistical benefits of music in education." Arete Music Academy, 2014.


Music programs are constantly in danger of being cut from shrinking school budgets even though they're proven to improve academics.

"Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools." 

National Center for Education Statistics, 2015.


Children who study a musical instrument are more likely to excel in all of their studies, work better in teams, have enhanced critical thinking skills, stay in school, and pursue further education.

"Statistical benefits of music in education." Arete Music Academy, 2014.


In the past, secondary students who participated in a music group at school reported the lowest lifetime and current use of all substances (tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs).

            "The Benefits of Music Education." VH1: Save the Music, 2015.


Schools with music programs have an estimated 90.2% graduation rate and 93.3% attendance rate compared to schools without music education, which average 72.9% graduation and 84.9% attendance.

        "Music Makes the Grade." The National Association for Music Education, 2015.


Regardless of socioeconomic status or school district, students (3rd graders) who participate in high-quality music programs score higher on reading and spelling tests.

        "Associations between music education, intelligence, and spelling ability

 in elementary school." Advanced Cognitive Psychology 7 (2011)


A Stanford study shows that music engages areas of the brain which are involved with paying attention, making predictions and updating events in our memory.

        "Music moves brain to pay attention, Stanford study finds." Stanford Medicine, 2015.


Much like expert technical skills, mastery in arts and humanities is closely correlated to a greater understanding of language components.

        "Musical training helps language processing, studies show."Stanford News, 2015.


Young children who take music lessons show different brain development and improved memory over the course of a year, compared to children who do not receive musical training.

        "The Benefits of the Study of Music." National Association for Music Education, 2014.


Music majors are the most likely group of college grads to be admitted to medical school.

Lewis Thomas, Case for Music in the Schools, Phi Delta Kappa, 1994 


Students who participate in school band or orchestra have the lowest levels of current and lifelong use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs among any group in our society. 

H. Con. Res. 266, United States Senate, June 13, 2000 


High school music students have been shown to hold higher grade point averages (GPA) than non-musicians in the same school.

National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 


78% of Americans feel learning a musical instrument helps students perform better in other subjects.

Gallup Poll, "American Attitudes Toward Music," 2003 


Nine out of ten adults and teenagers who play instruments agree that music making brings the family closer together.

Music Making and Our Schools, American Music Conference, 2000 


With music in schools, students connect to each other better-greater camaraderie, fewer fights, less racism and reduced use of hurtful sarcasm. 

Eric Jensen, Arts With the Brain in Mind, 2001 


71% of Americans surveyed by the Gallup Poll believe that teenagers who play an instrument are less likely to have disciplinary problems. 

Gallup Poll, "American Attitudes Toward Music," 2003 


A study of 7,500 university students revealed that music majors scored the highest reading scores among all majors including English, biology, chemistry and math. 

The Case for Music in the Schools, Phi Delta Kappa, 1994 


Students who were exposed to music-based lessons scored a full 100% higher on fractions tests than those who learned in the conventional manner. 

Neurological Research, March 15, 1999 


The schools that produced the highest academic achievement in the United States today are spending 20% to 30% of the day on the arts, with special emphasis on music. 

International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IAEEA) Test, 1988 


Music enhances the process of learning. The systems they nourish, which include our integrated sensory, attention, cognitive, emotional and motor capacities, are shown to be the driving forces behind all other learning.

Konrad, R.R., Empathy, Arts and Social Studies, 2000 


Teaching through the arts motivates children and increases their aptitude for learning. 

Eric Jensen, Arts With the Brain in Mind, 2001 


During moments of musical euphoria, blood travels through the brain to areas where other stimuli can produce feelings of contentment and joy-and travels away from brain cell areas associated with depression and fear.

Dr. Frederick Tims, reported in AMC Music News, June 2, 1999 


Students of lower socioeconomic status gain as much or more from arts instruction than those of higher socioeconomic status.

James Catterall et al., 1999 


95% of Americans in a 2003 Gallup Poll believe that music is a key component in a child's well-rounded education; three quarters of those surveyed feel that schools should mandate music education. 

Gallup Poll, "American Attitudes Toward Music," 2003 


Martin Gardiner of Brown University tracked the criminal records of Rhode Island residents from birth through age 30, and he concluded the more a resident was involved in music, the lower the person's arrest record.

Music Linked to Reduced Criminality, MuSICA Research Notes, Winter 2000 


With music instruction in schools, teachers found that students were less aggressive. 

Konrad, R.R., Empathy, Arts and Social Studies, 2000 


Students of lower socioeconomic status who took music lessons in grades 8-12 increased their math scores significantly as compared to non-music students. But just as important, reading, history, geography and even social skills soared by 40%. 

Gardiner, Fox, Jeffrey and Knowles, 


“When I hear people asking how do we fix the education system, I tell them we need to do the opposite of what is happening, cutting budgets by cutting music programs…. Nothing could be stupider than removing the ability for the left and right brains to function. Ask a CEO what they are looking for in an employee and they say they need people who understand teamwork, people who are disciplined, people who understand the big picture. You know what they need? They need musicians.”

Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, MENC Centennial Congress,

Orlando, Florida, June 2007Music Education Facts – Concert Program


“At this time when you are making critical and far-reaching budget and program decisions…I write to bring to your attention the importance of the arts as a core academic subject and part of a complete education for all students.  The Elementary and Secondary Education Act defines the arts as a core subject, and the arts play a significant role in children’s development and learning process.  The arts can help students become tenacious, team-oriented problem solvers who are confident and able to think creatively.”

Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education, 2009


Playing an instrument as a kid leads to a sharper mind in old age, according to a new study conducted by Brenda Hanna-Pladdy, a clinical neuropsychologist in Emory’s Department of neurology, and her colleagues.  The researchers gave 70 people between the ages of 60 and 83 a battery of tests to measure memory and other cognitive abilities.  The researchers found that those who had played an instrument for a decade or longer scored significantly higher on the tests than those with no musical background.

Scientific American, 2011


The College Board showed that students who took four years of arts and music classes while in high school scored 91 points better on their SATs than students who took only one-half year or less. (1070 vs. 979, respectively).  

The College Board, Data from 2009


Nearly 100% of past winners in the prestigious Siemens Westinghouse Competition in Math, Science and Technology (for high school students) play one or more musical instruments. This led the Siemens Foundation to host a recital at Carnegie Hall in 2004, featuring some of these young people, after which a panel of experts debated the nature of the apparent science/music link.

“The Midland Chemist.” American Chemical Society, 2005


With music in schools, students connect to each other better-greater camaraderie, fewer fights, less racism and reduced use of hurtful sarcasm.

“Arts With the Brain in Mind.” Eric Jensen, 2001


Students who participate in school band or orchestra have the lowest levels of current and lifelong use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs among any group in our society.

H. Con. Res. 266, United States Senate, June 13, 2000


Music training helps under-achievers. Students lagging behind in scholastic performance caught up to their fellow students in reading and surpassed their classmates in math by 22% when given music instruction over seven months.

Nature, May 23, 1996



For more information on the importance music and the arts plays in your child’s success, and how you as a parent can engage, visit these sites:


AMParents.org  -- The National Association of Music Parents
www.vh1savethemusic.org  --  Save The Music Foundation, VH-1

The OFFICIAL WEBSITE for the Cushing Bands of Cushing, Oklahoma.

FACTS ABOUT MUSIC EDUCATION